Taking Travel Photos on an iPhone | A Guide for Beginners | DNF

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Taking photos, especially when you’re somewhere epic, is something we all do. Especially as digital nomads, it pretty much comes with the territory. Not all of us however carry around a huge DSLR camera with all the gadgets and gizmos. Over the years, I feel as though I’ve come to finesse the art of taking travel photos on an iPhone, and thought it’s about time I shared some tips and tricks!

 

When it comes to travel pictures there are a few things to note to get the very best out of them. 

 

Taking Travel Photos on an iPhone

A gorgeous view is a gorgeous view, and a beautiful building is just that. For the most part, with views and buildings, having the direct sun on it will show it the best. (Unless it’s a sunset, in which you are obviously shooting into the sun.)

 

Dealing with Shadows

If you are taking a picture of a person and a view, but the sun is really high you will see shadows on the face that aren’t particularly flattering. In this case, I would recommend sunglasses to minimise the under eye shadows.
It’s a simple, somewhat vain hack, but it does make a difference.

Also consider your posing in this. If the light is bad on your face, then I would recommend doing a ‘in action’ or nonchalant pose where you are not facing the camera, but actually looking into the view.

 

Burst mode is your friend!!

If you are wanting to get more ‘vibey’ shots and help them to look less posed, the press and hold function is a winner.

It is also really helpful if you are travelling alone as you can preeeetttyy much get anyone to press and hold.

You can then move and dance around to catch your vibe and you are SURE to find one good one in the mix!

 

Make sure that the exposure is balanced.

You know sometimes when you’re taking a picture and the camera dances around glowing white and dark until it finds where it feels is right? Well you can click anywhere on your picture to set the exposure.

If the sky is showing white and there is a person in the foreground, but you click on the sky to expose to, your person will become a silhouette. If you click to expose the person, and the sky bleaches out, again you’ve gone too far.

In this instance, I would use the slider to adjust the exposure to a middle ground. The slider should come up on the right of the ‘focus box’. Simply move the sun icon up and down to adjust the exposure.

Then use an editing app, such as VSCO, do pull up/down highlights and shadows and play with the contrast. This way you can ensure you are getting all the detail coming through.

 

Hopefully you’ll find some of these hacks handy! Let us know if you would like any more guides like this, like editing for Instagram stories etc! We’d love to know your thoughts.

Until next time!

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